Category Archives: Microphones

Drop the Mic with A-T

Have you ever witnessed a mic drop? It’s a victorious moment, one of personal definition and momentous achievement.

Did you just school the haters in their own schoolyard? Drop the mic! Did you just bust the fattest freestyle flow anyone has seen or heard since the’80s in Harlem? You better drop the mic!

Basically a “mic drop” (whether or not someone literally drops a microphone) is a declaration and celebration of achievement. If you’ve ever “dropped the mic,” we’d like to hear about it. Share your amazing audio victories with us. Did you win an award for something music related? Did you get a standing ovation you weren’t expecting? Whatever the nature of your victory, A-T wants to know about it.

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Robert Bigelow’s Tips on Mid-Side Mic Recording

Robert Bigelow’s Tips on Mid-Side Mic Recording

robert bigelowContinuing our series of Livestream sessions at NAB 2014, we return to Robert C. Bigelow for a new discussion on mid-side microphone recording.

While hardly a new technique, many engineers shun mid-side because they don’t know how to properly execute this technique. Luckily for us, veteran sound mixer/editor Robert Bigelow does, and he was on hand to show attendees how it’s done.

Mid-side microphone recording is used primarily for capturing ambient sounds and live music. It permits a wide array of stereo field sizes, much wider than with a single stereo microphone. Mid-side lets the engineer make the stereo field as wide or as narrow as desired. Here’s how it works.

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Steve Lagudi Blog Series: Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – Acoustic Guitars, Part 1

This is the ninth installment in guest blogger Steve Lagudi’s series on Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – if you missed his latest post – Part 2 of his series on Dynamics and Effects – you can read it here.

I know…you are probably thinking, acoustic guitars in metal and hard rock?! Yep, it does happen. There are two usual approaches when dealing with acoustics. Some have a built-in pickup, which can sound good, but oftentimes doesn’t, so using a good DI box and bypassing (setting flat) any of the tone controls can give you something better to work with. The second approach: using mics on it. Once again, it can be either a dynamic, condenser, or a combination of both mics and even a combination of the mics and the DI.

On the road again.

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Fred Ginsburg’s Tips for Rigging Lavalier Microphones

Lavalier microphones are smaller electret or dynamic mics used for public speaking, television, theater and film applications.

Fred Ginsburg is a veteran sound mixer and educator known for his work on television and film. From the Audio-Technica booth at NAB 2014, Ginsburg delivered an informative lecture on the best practices for using lavalier mics. Here is a summary of what we learned.

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Steve Lagudi Blog Series: Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – Treatment: Dynamics and Effects, Part 2

This is the eighth installment in guest blogger Steve Lagudi’s series on Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – if you missed Part 1 of his posts on Dynamics and Effects, you can read it here.

Now for the fun part! Effects. Some folks would ask “Why add effects, most guitar players have a billion pedals in front of ’em, so why add more?” Well, why not? No doubt the players are adding in effects to create a specific sound, with reverbs, delays, flange, chorus, phase, and so on and so on. Sometimes those effects might not translate very well when mic’d up and coming through a PA, so we might need to help support it, or even gloss it up more to help it stand out.

Steve’s home while on the road.

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A-T at InfoComm 2014

InfoComm is the largest professional AV industry trade show and A-T was part of all the action.

From June 18–20 in Las Vegas, more than 950 AV companies showcased more than 10,000 products for the 36,000-plus people in attendance. The desert heat was oppressive, with the temperature breaking 100 degrees on Friday, but it was no match for the cutting-edge AV technology inside the convention center.

We added five new products to our expansive line of innovative, professional audio gear, and all this cool tech was more than enough to combat the summer heat. Here’s what we rolled out:

audio-technica headphonesATND971 Network Microphone

This ATND971 condenser boundary microphone features a Dante™ network output and user programmable switch. Use the switch to trigger a camera, dim the lights, or control some other device on the network, all while keeping your presentation rolling with clear audio.

Here’s a brief explanation of what you can do with the ATND971:

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3 Tips for Recording Group Vocals with a Single Mic

Using a single mic to record a group of vocalists allows the singers to control their blend and balance more naturally than if they were recorded individually. The result can be a richer, more organic sound.

With that in mind, we’ve put together a few tips that will help you record a small vocal group as a single unit.

1. Figure 8 Pickup Pattern with Two Vocalists

Using an AT4047MP multi-pattern condenser microphone set to  figure 8 will allow you to record two singers with one mic. Place a singer on each side of the mic. The front and rear half of the mic act as if there were two cardioid elements in one housing back-to-back. The balance of the vocalists can be controlled by adjusting their relative distance from the mic.

recording group vocals

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How to Record Solo Vocals in 4 Steps

The human voice is the most complex, most dynamic instrument you will ever record. Lead vocals are the centerpiece of most tracks, though they may be the most difficult to nail in the recording process.

Below, you’ll find everything you need to know to capture vocals during the recording process.

1. Reduce Ambience and Plosives

Before you can capture the ideal vocal sound, you have to make sure that you don’t capture excessive ambience and plosives.

a. Plosives are bursts of air that can be created when singing or speaking consonants, especially p’s and b’s. Place a pop filter between the singer and mic to prevent the bursts of air from distorting the sound.

A

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6 Simple Tips for Recording Voice-Overs

Recording voice-overs, podcasts and other types of spoken word has its own unique set of demands. However, it’s still possible to capture professional quality sound without spending a fortune. Below, Audio-Technica has a few helpful bits of advice to get you started.

1. The Microphone

For voice-over and spoken word, the most important link in the signal chain is the microphone. Try an AT2020 USB cardioid condenser microphone. This microphone not only sounds great, but the USB output allows you to bypass an audio interface and plug directly into your computer where the digital signal can be recorded and mixed using your favorite recording software.

the microphone

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