Category Archives: Microphones

Meet the Newest Addition to Our Family: #ATMicMan

Screen Shot 2014-08-21 at 9.24.49 AMLooking for a friend for your next concert? Even if you have a big crowd, there’s probably room for #ATMicMan. He tends to get in for free, too.

In all seriousness, Audio-Technica wants to see where you’re going this summer (and what you’re hearing when you get there). It’s a simple process: just print out a copy of #ATMicMan, take him with you and snap a photo of him at your destination.

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A Look at our 40 Series Microphones

Award-winning producers, engineers and musicians everywhere have come to rely on Audio-Technica’s 40 Series studio microphones for their superior, dependable performance. They turn to these mics again and again for a sonic consistency that’s hard to find elsewhere.

Each of these microphones is individually tested and inspected for 100 percent quality assurance. If it doesn’t pass, we don’t sell it, simple as that. We’d like to talk about a couple of our 40 Series mics in detail to give you an inside look.

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Drop the Mic with A-T

Have you ever witnessed a mic drop? It’s a victorious moment, one of personal definition and momentous achievement.

Did you just school the haters in their own schoolyard? Drop the mic! Did you just bust the fattest freestyle flow anyone has seen or heard since the’80s in Harlem? You better drop the mic!

Basically a “mic drop” (whether or not someone literally drops a microphone) is a declaration and celebration of achievement. If you’ve ever “dropped the mic,” we’d like to hear about it. Share your amazing audio victories with us. Did you win an award for something music related? Did you get a standing ovation you weren’t expecting? Whatever the nature of your victory, A-T wants to know about it.

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Robert Bigelow’s Tips on Mid-Side Mic Recording

Robert Bigelow’s Tips on Mid-Side Mic Recording

robert bigelowContinuing our series of Livestream sessions at NAB 2014, we return to Robert C. Bigelow for a new discussion on mid-side microphone recording.

While hardly a new technique, many engineers shun mid-side because they don’t know how to properly execute this technique. Luckily for us, veteran sound mixer/editor Robert Bigelow does, and he was on hand to show attendees how it’s done.

Mid-side microphone recording is used primarily for capturing ambient sounds and live music. It permits a wide array of stereo field sizes, much wider than with a single stereo microphone. Mid-side lets the engineer make the stereo field as wide or as narrow as desired. Here’s how it works.

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Steve Lagudi Blog Series: Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – Acoustic Guitars, Part 1

This is the ninth installment in guest blogger Steve Lagudi’s series on Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – if you missed his latest post – Part 2 of his series on Dynamics and Effects – you can read it here.

I know…you are probably thinking, acoustic guitars in metal and hard rock?! Yep, it does happen. There are two usual approaches when dealing with acoustics. Some have a built-in pickup, which can sound good, but oftentimes doesn’t, so using a good DI box and bypassing (setting flat) any of the tone controls can give you something better to work with. The second approach: using mics on it. Once again, it can be either a dynamic, condenser, or a combination of both mics and even a combination of the mics and the DI.

On the road again.

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Fred Ginsburg’s Tips for Rigging Lavalier Microphones

Lavalier microphones are smaller electret or dynamic mics used for public speaking, television, theater and film applications.

Fred Ginsburg is a veteran sound mixer and educator known for his work on television and film. From the Audio-Technica booth at NAB 2014, Ginsburg delivered an informative lecture on the best practices for using lavalier mics. Here is a summary of what we learned.

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Steve Lagudi Blog Series: Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – Treatment: Dynamics and Effects, Part 2

This is the eighth installment in guest blogger Steve Lagudi’s series on Guitars & Bass in a Live Setting – if you missed Part 1 of his posts on Dynamics and Effects, you can read it here.

Now for the fun part! Effects. Some folks would ask “Why add effects, most guitar players have a billion pedals in front of ’em, so why add more?” Well, why not? No doubt the players are adding in effects to create a specific sound, with reverbs, delays, flange, chorus, phase, and so on and so on. Sometimes those effects might not translate very well when mic’d up and coming through a PA, so we might need to help support it, or even gloss it up more to help it stand out.

Steve’s home while on the road.

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