Category Archives: Guest Blogger Series

Frank Klepacki Blog Series: What Will The Future Hold For Music Artists? Part 1

Frank KlepackiThis is the 14th installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank talks about what the future holds for music artists. If you missed Frank’s previous post, you can read it here.

There is quite a bit of discussion out there in terms of where the music business is at, and where it’s headed. The old model crumbled under the digital age, for failure to embrace it in the beginning. Digital music download sales now compete with subscription-based streaming services. The CD used to cost an average of $15, and you had to buy the whole album even if you only liked a couple of songs, unless there was a single available. Digital sales gave you the option to download and purchase only your favorite songs if you wish, and now streaming services use monthly subscription fees to have access to all music content on the service. The problems are that compensation to the artists continually went down with each of these progressions, overall sales are still declining, streaming services haven’t been profitable yet, and piracy is still an issue. With music seeming to be devalued by the current generation in this way, the only way a newer artist can do anything financially substantial with their art is to seek other non-traditional avenues.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Sound Effects For Video Games, Part 2

Frank KlepackiFrank Klepacki Blog Series: Sound Effects For Video Games, Part 2

This is the 13th installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank talks about sound effects for video games. If you missed Frank’s previous post, you can read it here.

Establishing the games “mixing board” in my experience, starts with what we refer to as “Presets.” Presets are basically a defined set of parameters that contain all the basic things you need to adjust for a sound effect, including volume, pitch, distance settings, panning, filtering levels, priority, and anything else of importance. You could compare this to the idea of setting up a “Bus” for sub-mixing.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Sound Effects For Video Games, Part 1

Frank KlepackiThis is the 12th installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank talks about sound effects for video games. If you missed Frank’s previous post, you can read it here.

Sound effects in video games have a different angle and approach than working in linear media.

With TV and film, you are working with all the respective tracks in a mix, placing it in surround, and ensuring that the desired experience is heard appropriately the same way every time. You have full control over that, and you remain in the comfort zone of your DAW.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Breaking Your Fear, Finding Your Voice: Part 2

Frank KlepackiThis is the 11th installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank talks about how to break through fear and find your voice. If you missed Frank’s previous post on electronic dance music, you can read it here.

I figured in order to tap into my love of funk and soul music, I needed to start by imitating funk band singers I loved, such as Sly Stone, Al Green, Larry Graham, Prince, & D’Angleo.  I spent quite a bit of time trying to imitate them and writing songs where I was trying to sound like them.  I recorded an albums worth of stuff and was excited about the idea of releasing it – but something held me back.  I couldn’t put my finger on it but something just didn’t feel right about releasing it.  After taking some time to think on it and come back to it, I discovered that it just didn’t feel like it was my “own” voice.  It felt like an impersonation.  Which it was. Ultimately it took a bit of “soul” searching (pun intended) – but I realized through that experience, that impersonation was not my actual goal.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Breaking Your Fear, Finding Your Voice: Part 1

Frank KlepackiThis is the tenth installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank talks about how to break through fear and find your voice. If you missed Frank’s previous post on electronic dance music, you can read it here.

Early in my career, I realized even though I can compose and produce music, I didn’t sing, and was afraid to try.  Being in bands and recording in the studio, if something was ever vocally off, my ear would catch it, but I wouldn’t be able to sing it to offer another suggestion or correction.  I needed to find to way to break this fear.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: The Interesting Thing About EDM

Frank KlepackiThis is the ninth installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank explores the possibilities of electronic dance music. If you missed Frank’s previous post on video game scoring, you can read it here.

The Electronic Dance Music genre has gained popularity over the last few years to the point that it has crossed over into pop, and there have been festivals dedicated to it and created a number of lucrative DJing opportunities for the artists. When I first took notice of it, I asked myself what is the big deal? Why is this a thing now?

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Creating Musical Scores – Video Games Present Different Challenges Than Film and TV, Part 2

Frank KlepackiThis is the eighth installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank continues to examine the unique character of video game scoring. If you missed Part 1, you can read it here.

I like to start off with establishing main themes for the primary characters or factions the player will identify with. The intent is that I will revisit those themes/melodies throughout the game’s soundtrack in the different situations the player encounters as that character/faction. If there are cinematic scenes that pop up in between gameplay, these themes can be used in those as well. They form a good foundation to build on.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Creating Musical Scores – Video Games Present Different Challenges Than Film and TV, Part 1

Frank KlepackiThis is the seventh installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank looks at how scoring for video games differs from scoring for film and TV. If you missed Frank’s previous post on incorporating analog elements into the digital studio, you can read it here.

The Video Game industry is big business, and the quality of the medium offers all kinds of different and fun experiences for the casual or hardcore gamer. Gaming is but another entertainment choice, competing with music, movies and television, and it appeals to all different ages.

As a composer, it’s important to know what the differences are in the approach to scoring a video game from scoring for the other forms of media.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Getting the Best of Both Worlds: Digital with Analog, Part 2

Frank KlepackiThis is the sixth installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank continues to examine how adding analog elements to digital recording can positively affect the result. If you missed Part 1, you can read it here.

After running our mics through tube pre’s, we then look to plugins to help enhance our mix and the analog sound, depending on how far we wish to take it in our respective DAWs.

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Frank Klepacki Blog Series: Getting the Best of Both Worlds: Digital with Analog, Part 1

Frank KlepackiThis is the fifth installment in guest blogger Frank Klepacki’s series on music production. Today Frank discusses adding analog aspects to digital recording. If you missed Frank’s previous post on the role of the music producer, you can read it here.

For a great while now, people have been making music digitally. Whether they transitioned over from analog, or started digitally from the get-go, it’s a reality, a convenience and, moving forward, will be the norm of how music production is introduced to future generations.

While today’s up-and-comers making albums in their bedrooms and garages may never know what it means to cut tape or use a large format console, there are some ideas worth sharing to help and encourage their decision-making when recording in the future.

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